Gordon (M) Grohman (88) died last Friday May 1, 2020 surrounded by the nurses in St. Lukes ICU from COVID19. Gordon was born February 14, 1932 in Chicago, IL. When he was thirteen, his family moved to Southern California and settled in Sherman Oaks in the San Fernando Valley. Gordon was in college when his squadron was called to active duty in the Korean war. He returned to college and got his degree in business. He worked for National Biscuit Company and became, at the time, the youngest District Sales Manager in the history of Nabisco and was transferred to Kansas City, MO.

He met his wife, Therese, who was a model in New York City and was home in Kansas City for a visit. They dated for three weeks, got engaged, and had been married since 1961. They had two children. Gordon Michael (Holly) and Meg Winne (Jim), and 6 grandchildren, Peggy Olivarez (Henry), Bridie Biersmith (Ben), Tess Grohmann, Gordon Jacob Grohmann, Molly Winne, Aidan Winne, and one great-granddaughter, Bellona Olivarez.
Gordon decided after the children were born that he did not want to leave Kansas City so he started a company, Continental Television, in 1965. The company leased TV equipment for hospital rooms. He built the business to include 300 hospitals across the country by 1975. He expanded the business by developing a computerized pharmacy system to assist pharmacists in the hospital. He sold these systems around the world and the company went public in 1983 under their new name Continental Healthcare Systems. The company was acquired in 1989 by a large German Company who wanted to enter the hospital field in the United States.
In 1981 he started a company with his son, Gordon Michael, called TMX. The company initially devoted their energy to computerized messaging for industry and had clients all across the country. They later expanded back into the hospital arena by developing a program for nurse staffing. This company was bought out in 2005. After his entrepreneurial career had come to a close he enjoyed his time with his wife Therese until she passed on March 31st, 2017.
While enjoying the success of his business Gordon took time to enjoy his hobbies as well. He loved playing golf and playing Gin Rummy, his favorite card game. He was an artist and loved sharing his paintings with family and friends. He also loved plants having at one time owned a small plant store. He and Therese traveled the world together seeing all four corners and then some. They wintered in Palm Springs, and spent time at their condo in Vail, Colorado in the summer, and traveling to Ireland, the ansentral home of Theres’s family. They were an outgoing pair, they loved entertaining, and enjoyed their Country Club memberships with their family and many, many friends. They always had a full social calendar. Gordon was a very hard working and successful man, and played as hard as he worked. Everyone who came in contact with admired his zest for life. When Gordon entered a room he lit it up with his charm and sweet nature. He was a friend to many, a devoted husband, father and grandfather, and a man of God. He is now reunited with his bride in heaven, and he is at peace.
Gordon’s funeral and Catholic mass will be held at a later date due to the COVID 19 limitations. In lieu of flowers please donate meals to the COVID ICU at St. Lukes on the Plaza.”Don’t grieve for me, for now I am free. I’m following the path God laid for me. I took his hand when I heard him call. I turned my back and left it all. I could not stay another day, to laugh, to love, to work or play. Tasks undone must stay that way. I’ve found that peace at the close of the day. If parting has left a void, then fill it with remembered joy. A friendship shared, a laugh, a kiss. Ah, yes, these things I too will miss. Be not burdened with times of sorrow. I wish for you the sunshine of tomorrow. My life’s been full, I savored much. Good friends, good times, a loved one’s touch. Perhaps my time seemed all too brief. Don’t lengthen it now with undue grief. Lift up your hearts and share with me. God wants me now, he set me free”